Literacy: Speaking and Listening

High quality talk leads to high quality literacy…
Spoken language underpins the development of reading and writing. The quality and variety
of language that pupils hear and speak are vital for developing their vocabulary and
grammar and their understanding for reading and writing. 
                                                 

 The National Curriculum 2014

At St Augustine's our vision is for children to become fluent and confident communicators who are increasingly
matching their style and responses to their purpose and audience.

In addition, we aim to ensure all children :

  • Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers.
  • Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge.
  • Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary.
  • Articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions.
  • Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes,
    including for expressing feelings.
  • Maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on
    topic and initiating and responding to comments.
  • Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising,
    imagining and exploring ideas.
  • Speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English.
  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play, improvisations and
    debates.
  • Gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s).
  • Consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the
    contributions of others.
  • Select and use appropriate registers for effective communication.
  • Develop a capacity to explain their understanding of books and other reading, and to
    prepare their ideas before they write.

As a school, we will endeavour to reach these aims across the different age ranges.

In Foundation Stage by incorporating the Development Matters and the Early Learning Goals into our planning and teaching, which ensures that our pupils:

  • Use language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences
  • Develop active listening and response
  • Interact with others in both indoor and outdoor play
  • Use language to ‘get things done’


In Key Stage 1 by building on pupils’ prior learning in speaking and listening by encouraging pupils to speak according to the context, with consideration for their audience. In addition by:

  • Providing the time for pupils to orally rehearse their ideas prior to writing.
  • Providing opportunities for children to read aloud different text types to an audience
    and their own written work.
  • Developing pupils’ ability to use language imaginatively
  • Providing opportunities for children to express their ideas and feelings through drama
    activities, discussions about books and debates.
  • Teaching pupils to work effectively and collaboratively in groups and with their talk
    partners.
  • Expecting pupils to join in with discussions and make relevant contributions
  • Teaching pupils to listen carefully and actively
  • Encouraging children to experiment with new and interesting vocabulary they
    discover

In Key Stage 2 by building on pupils’ attainment and speaking and listening experiences at Key Stage 1. In addition by: 

  • Developing pupils’ ability to speak in a range of contexts with increasing sense of
    audience and purpose
  • Teaching children to understand and apply the conventions for discussion and
    debate.
  • Providing opportunities for children to adopt, create and sustain a range of roles,
    responding appropriately to others in role.

Literacy: Reading

At St Augustine’s our vision is to ensure that all children understand the importance of reading as a message getting activity which can broaden their imagination, transport them to another world, inform, help to develop vocabulary and ultimately provide a gateway to all areas of the curriculum.

In addition we aim to ensure all children:

  • Establish a love of reading
  • Read fluently, using phrasing and intonation
  • Develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • Acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading
  • Self-monitor and self-correct their reading using meaning, structure and visual information
  • Transfer the strategies taught in guided reading and shared reading into their independent reading
  • Can respond accordingly to and distinguish between literal and inferential questions
  • Have the phonic ability to decode (segment and blend) unfamiliar printed words and have quick recognition of familiar printed words

 

As a school we will endeavour to reach these aims by:

  • Demonstrating our enjoyment of reading through shared reading
  • Modelling how to use strategies effectively during shared and guided reading
  • Allowing children to access higher level texts during shared reading which introduce them to a wide range of vocabulary in context
  • Using a range of texts and genres during guided and shared reading
  • Posing questions which prompt self-monitoring – You said…Did that make sense? Does that sound right? Does that look right?
  • Giving specific and personalised feedback about a child’s reading during guided reading
  • Making the distinction clear between literal and inferential questions
  • Delivering daily phonics sessions in KS 1
  • Discussing texts and encouraging prediction
  • Asking children to explain their views using evidence from the text to justify  

Pupil’s expectations in reading across the age ranges

Early Years

In Early Years children start to read and understand simple sentences.  They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and begin to read them aloud accurately.   They also begin to read some common irregular words and demonstrate an understanding when talking to others about what they have read.

Year one

In year one children will begin to apply their phonic knowledge to decode unfamiliar words, read words with contractions (for example I’m, I’ll, we’ll) understanding that the apostrophe represents the omitted letter(s) and read common exception words.  Furthermore children will be listening to and discussing a range of texts at a level beyond which they can read independently, become familiar with traditional tales and be able to retell them.    Children will be able to make predictions based on what has been read so far, check that a text makes sense and correct inaccurate reading. 

Year two  

In year two children will begin to read words accurately by blending and recognise the alternative sounds for letters.  They will read words containing common suffixes (word endings), words of two or more syllables and continue to read further common exception words.  Moreover, children will continue to listen to a range of texts, expressing their views during discussion.  Children will be able to make predictions, answer and ask questions about what they have read and explain their understanding of a text clearly.

Year three & four

In years three and four children will apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes to enable them to read aloud and understand the meaning of new vocabulary.  They will also continue to read further exception words.  Children will experience a wide range of text types and genres (for example, poetry, plays, myths and legends) and read for a range of purposes.  In addition, children will be able to infer characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions and justify their inferences with evidence from the text.

Year five & six

In years five and six children will continue to apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes.  They will be continuing to read and discuss a wide range of texts and read for a range of purposes.  Children are now increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books including modern fiction and books from other cultures and traditions.  Children will be able to make comparisons within and across books and predict what may happen based on details that are stated and implied.  Children will be able to summarise the main ideas within a text and discuss and evaluate the author’s language whilst considering its impact on the reader.  During text discussions children will share their own views using evidence to justify their thinking and challenge opposing views courteously.  

 

Impact of the Teaching of Reading on our children

Last year end of Key Stage Assessments showed that in Key Stage 1 69% of children reached the age related expectation or higher. At Key Stage 2, 87% of children reached age related expectation and 39% of children reached the higher standard in reading. 

These externally assessed results confirm that at St Augustine's, we work hard to ensure the vast majority of our children leave our school able to, not only enjoy the love of reading, but also to use reading as a tool to access other areas of the curriculum and develop in to skilled learners.

Literacy: Writing

 

At St Augustine’s our vision is to ensure that all children understand the importance of writing as a message giving process. We further aim to enable our children to communicate in the written form in as many ways as possible, to the very best of their potential.

In addition, we aim to ensure all children can:

  • Understand different purposes and audiences for their writing and the importance of remembering these as they are writing.
  • Plan texts according to the correct purpose and audience.
  • Write regularly in a variety of forms.
  • Recognise that writing can be a collaborative effort.
  • Recognise that drafting and redrafting is an essential part of the writing process.
  • Be able to understand that the English language has different grammatical conventions and use their grammatical knowledge to write effectively.
  • Recognise that spelling is an important skill and ensure that children have a range of strategies to correctly spell the written word.
  • Write using legible handwriting and with care and pride in the presentation of their work. 

 

As a school we will endeavor to reach these aims by:

  • Modelling shared and guided writing
  • Using a range of high quality texts to inspire children let them see how good authors use written language effectively.
  • Helping children to understand the steps and features they need to include in their writing so they can apply the steps taken in the drafting and editing process.
  • Encouraging children to self and peer assess their work against appropriate success criteria.
  • Marking using an agreed marking code so that children are signposted to their mistakes and encouraged to improve their work by editing and re drafting it.
  • Giving children opportunities to write from real life experiences as well as opportunities to write in a variety of forms, different purposes and for different audiences across the curriculum.
  • Teaching appropriate grammar skills in the context of writing.
  • Teaching regular spelling strategies so that children can apply this to their written work.
  • Model and teach appropriate handwriting skills to enable children to write as neatly as they possibly can. 

Pupil's expectations in writing across the age ranges include:

 

  • In Early Years children start to use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds. They also write some irregular common words. They begin to write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly and others are phonetically plausible.
  • In Year 1 children begin to spell words using spelling rules from as set out in The National Curriculum for Year 1. These include words containing each of the 40+ phonemes already taught and some common exception words. They begin to write sentences by saying out loud what they are going to write about, sequence sentences to write short stories and re-read what they have written to check it makes sense. In addition, they start to develop and understand grammatical concepts as laid out in the National Curriculum for Year 1 such as capital letters, singular/plural, full stops, question and exclamation marks. In their handwriting, they sit correctly at a table - holding a pencil comfortably and correctly. They start to form lower case letters in the correct direction and begin to form capital letters.
  • In Year 2   children start to spell words by segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes - as well as learning to spell more common exception words. Children begin to spell words using spelling rules set out in The National Curriculum for Year 2.  Children begin to write for different purposes including writing stories about their personal and others' experiences (fictional and real). They start to plan simply for a written task and make simple additions, revisions and corrections to their own writing. They read aloud what they have written with appropriate intonation. They start to develop and understand grammatical concepts as laid out in the National Curriculum for Year 2 such as capital letters, singular/plural, full stops, question and exclamation marks. In their handwriting children start to form lower case and capital letters of the correct size, begin to start joining letters.
  • In Years 3 & 4 children begin to spell words using spelling rules from The National Curriculum for Years 3 and 4 and the word lists specific to Years 3 and 4. They start to be able to use dictionaries to check spelling. Children start to discuss writing similar to the texts they are planning for. They begin to draft and write texts organised appropriately and use different sentence structures. They can organise their work into paragraphs. They start to edit and improve their work based on features linked to a text's purpose and audience. Children can begin to read aloud their own writing, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone so the meaning is clear. In addition, they start to develop and understand grammatical concepts as laid out in the National Curriculum for Year 3 and 4. These include: using different adverbs, conjunctions and prepositions; using different verb tenses (including the present perfect) and punctuating direct speech. In their handwriting, children can join appropriate letters and increase the legibility and consistency of their written work.
  • In Years 5 & 6 children use the spelling rules laid out in all the previous year groups and also begin to spell words using spelling rules from The National Curriculum for Years 5 and 6. These include the words on the word lists specific to Year 5 and 6. They are able to use dictionaries and thesauruses. Children plan their texts by choosing the appropriate form by identifying the relevant purpose and audience. They use other quality texts to model their own writing on. They select appropriate vocabulary and grammar based on how it impacts the reader. They use different techniques to build cohesion across paragraphs. Children can select and control the verb tenses they use when writing. They can edit and improve their work based on its effectiveness against its purpose and audience. In addition, children develop and understand grammatical concepts as laid out in the National Curriculum for all the previous year groups and those specifically set out for Year 5 and 6, such as formal/informal tone; passive/active voice and more complex punctuation such as dashes and semi-colons. In their handwriting, children can write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed.  

 

Impact of the Teaching of Writing on our children

Last year end of Key Stage Assessments showed that in Key Stage 1 59% of children reached the age related expectation or higher. At Key Stage 2, 87% of children reached age related expectation. At Key Stage 2, 19% of children reached the higher standard in writing. In the explicit grammar tests 89% of Key Stage 2 children reached age related expectation and 45% reached the higher standard.

These externally assessed results confirm that at St Augustine's, we work hard to ensure the vast majority of our children leave our school ready to use and apply their writing skills to further develop themselves as learners.